Week 11: Nov. 6 and Nov. 8

Please check you have completed your assignments for the end of week 10.

Primary Source Analysis 2: due on Nov. 8 (11.59PM)

Username and password for PDFs are on the Canvas Homepage

Wed. Nov. 6: Jurchen-Jin and comparing non-Han rulers’ methods

  • Textbook: Hansen, Valerie. The Open Empire: A History of China to 1800Chapter 8, part 2 (pp. 289-307)
  • Primary source: Franke Herbert. “A Sung embassy diary of 1211-1212. The Shih-Chin Lu of Ch’eng Cho.” In: Bulletin de l’Ecole française d’Extrême-Orient. Tome 69, 1981. pp. 171-207. doi : 10.3406/befeo.1981.3362. (in Wade-Giles) (PDF)
            • Read diary pp. 176-204 (marked between red brackets); the intro and concluding remarks are for your information.
            • The notes provide some useful information, in particular on historical or mythical references contained in the text.
            • The war between the Mongols and the Jin has just started in 1211, and will end with the destruction of the Jin dynasty in 1234. This influences Cheng’s journey.
            • How does Cheng see his northern neighbors? What in this account do you find strange, remarkable or interesting? Highlight and we’ll talk more in class about those points.
  • Comparison of non-Han rulers of China: fill out this google sheet and bring to class.
  • Google form for map and timeline points for this class’ materials.
  • Slides (Gdrive link)

Fri. Nov. 8: And then the Mongols came…

  • Textbook: Hansen, Valerie. The Open Empire: A History of China to 1800Chapter 9- part 1 (308-322 [exclude “Mongol conquest of South China”])
  • Primary sources:
            • The Secret History of the Mongols: The Origin of Chingis Khan. An Adaptation by Paul Kahn. Boston: Cheng and Tsui Company, 1998. (PDF)
                      • Two “plot lines”: one is the destruction of the Xixia/Western Xia state of the Tangut; the other is the succession of Chinggis Khan, marked in red brackets.
            • Brief excerpt from the History of the Mongols by John of Plano Carpini. (PDF)
                      • Reference: The Mongol Mission: Narratives and Letters of the Franciscan Missionaries in Mongolia and China in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. Edited by Christoper Dawson. Makers of Christendom. New York: AMS Press, 1980.
                      • The Franciscan friar was sent in 1245 by Pope Innocent IV with Lawrence of Portugal to send a bull (papal public letter) to the Mongol Khan. The pope entertained hopes of creating an alliance with the Mongols against the Muslims. This is only a small excerpt of a longer work.
            • The letter of Guyuk Khan to Pope Innocent IV, dated 1246.(PDF)
                      • Reference: The Mongol Mission: Narratives and Letters of the Franciscan Missionaries in Mongolia and China in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. Edited by Christoper Dawson. Makers of Christendom. New York: AMS Press, 1980.
                      • This is the reply from the Mongol Khan to the pope to the mission seeking an alliance.
                      • “God” in the translation is not the Christian God, but the supreme deity of the Mongols, more akin to the Chinese concept of Tian or Heaven (as seen in the Mandate of Heaven)
            • Use these three excerpts to build a picture of the Mongols: how they see themselves, how they were seen by others, how they operated and why they were successful. As always, highlight whatever you find strange, interesting or remarkable and bring to class.
  • Slides (Gdrive link)
  • Google form for map and timeline points for this class’ materials.