Primary Source Analysis 2

Due by Nov. 8:

Draft of second Primary Source Analysis (link to syllabus description)

  • Format: google doc (<–use this template)
        • “shared” settings set to “anyone at Muhlenberg can comment” for peer review purposes.
        • Line spacing 1.5.
        • Use paragraphs.
        • Use footnotes and add a bibliography; use Chicago “notes and bibliography” style.
        • Tip: references on the website are provided in the Chicago bibliography style; adjust them when citing in footnotes.
  • 800 words (excl. footnotes, bibliography), ±10% for final version.
        • First version is not graded, don’t panic if you’re not yet at 800 words on Friday night: submit what you have.
  • Rewrite: possible, based on feedback and peer reviews.

List of source to choose from: At least ONE from this list:

  • Zhang Zeduan. “Scenes along the River during the Qingming Festival” (painting)
  • Lu You, excerpt from A Journey into Shu [=Sichuan]. From Inscribed Landscapes: Travel Writing from Imperial China. Translated by Richard Strassberg, 209-212.(PDF)
  • Dudbridge, Glen. A Portrait of Five Dynasties China : From the Memoirs of Wang Renyu (880-956). Oxford Oriental Monographs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. (one of two excerpts, PDF)
  • Franke, Herbert. “The “treatise On Punishments in the Liao History“. Central Asiatic Journal 27, no. 1/2 (1983): 9-38. (one of two excerpts, pp. 13-14 and pp. 28-29) (PDF)
  • Wright, David Curtis. From War to Diplomatic Parity in Eleventh-Century China : Sung’s Foreign Relations with Kitan Liao. History of Warfare, 33. Leiden: Brill, 2005. (PDF)
  • Wang Anshi. “Memorial on the Crop Loans Measure” and/or “Cheng Hao Remonstrance Against The New Laws”. Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1: From Earliest Times to 1600. 2nd edition, 616-619. Edited by Wm Th. de Bary and Irene Bloom. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1999. (PDF)
  • Han Yu. “Memorial Discussing the Buddha’s Bone”. In An Anthology of Chinese Literature, Beginnings to 1911. Edited and translated by Stephen Owen, 597-601. New York: W.W. Norton and Co, 1996.(PDF)
  • Liu Zongyuan. “Essay on Enfeoffment” (Fengjian lun). In Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1. 2nd edition. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1990.(PDF)
  • “The Quest of Mulian, or The Great Maudgalyāyana Rescues his Mother from Hell.” In Classical Chinese Literature. Edited by John Minford and Joseph S. M. Lau, 1088-1110. New York: Hong Kong: Columbia University Press; The Chinese University Press, 2000.(PDF)
  • Kroll, Paul. “The Flight from the Capital and the Death of the Precious Consort Yang.” In T’ang Studies 3 (1985). (PDF)
  • “Interlude: Xuan-zong and Yang the Prized Consort”. In An Anthology of Chinese Literature: Beginnings to 1911. Edited and translated by Stephen Owen, 441ff. New York: Norton, 1996. (PDF)
  • Wu Jing. The Essentials of Governance of the Reign of Constancy Revealed (Zhenguan zhengyao). Texts in the History of Political Thought. Edited and translated by Hilde De Weerdt et al. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming (2020). [Selection] (PDF)
  • “The Great Tang Code.” In Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1: From Earliest Times to 1600. 2nd edition, 546-552. Edited by Wm Th. de Bary and Irene Bloom. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1999. (PDF)
  • “Ballad of Mulan”. In An Anthology of Chinese Literature : Beginnings to 1911, translated and edited by Stephen Owen, 241-43. New York: W.W. Norton, 1997.(PDF)
  • Yang Xuanzhi. Excerpt from Chapter 1. In Jenner, W. J. F. Memories of Loyang : Yang Hsüan-Chih and the Lost Capital (493-534), 79-83. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981. (PDF)
  • Instructions for the Yan family (Yanshi jiaxun). Various translations and editions, see footnotes in document.(PDF)
  • Selection of the Sogdian Letters, translated by Nicholas Simms-Williams (PDF).
  • Excerpt from Mouzi. In Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1: From Earliest Times to 1600, 2nd edition, edited by Wm. Th. de Bary and Irene Bloom, 421-426. (PDF)
  • Robert Ford Campany, Signs from the Unseen Realm: Buddhist Miracle Tales from Early Medieval China, 71-77. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press/Kuroda Institute, 2012.

You may also choose from the earlier sources in this list:

  • “Chapter 9: The Basic Annals of Empress Lü”. In Records of the Grand Historian, Translated by Burton Watson. Revised edition. Columbia Univ. Press, 1993. (PDF)
  • Ban Zhao. “Instructions for Women”. In The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature, edited by Victor Mair, 534-41. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1994. (PDF)
  • Jia Yi’s “Discussion on the faults of the Qin”. In Sima Qian, Records of the Grand Historian, translated by Burton Watson, 74-83. Revised edition. Columbia Univ. Press, 1993. (PDF)
  • Sima Qian. “Chapter 6: The Basic Annals of the First Emperor of the Qin.” InRecords of the Grand Historian. Translated by Burton Watson. Revised edition. Columbia Univ. Press, 1993.(PDF)
  • “Penal Servitude in Qin Law.” In Ebrey, Patricia Buckley (ed.). Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook. Second Edition. New York: Free Press, 1993. (PDF)
  • “Legalists and Militarists.” In Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1: From Earliest Times to 1600. Edited by Wm. de Bary and Irene Bloom. Second Edition. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1999. (PDF)
  • Han Fei. The Complete Works of Han Fei Tzu: A Classic of Chinese Political Science. Translated by Wengui Liao. Probsthain’s Oriental Series, 25-26. London: Arthur Probsthain, 1959. (“The Two Handles”,and “Wielding the Sceptre”)
  • Crump, James I. Chan-Kuo Ts’e. 2. Ed., Rev ed. [occasional Series / Chinese Materials and Research Aids Service Center, 41]. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, 1979. (PDF)
  • Selection from Analects. In Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1: From Earliest Times to 1600. Edited by Wm. Theodore de Bary and Irene Bloom. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1999. (PDF)
  • Selection from Mencius. Translated by D.C. Lau. Penguin Classics, 1970. (PDF)
  • Excerpt from XunziVol. 1, books 1-6. Translated by John. Knoblockx. Stanford Univ. Press, 1988. (PDF)
  • Selection from Mozi: The Complete Translation. Translated by Ian Johnston. Hong Kong: Chinese Univ. Press, 2010. “Universal Love 1” (or “Impartial Care”) (PDF)
  • Selection from Laozi.Translated by D.C. Lau. Penguin Classics, 1963. (PDF)
  • Selection from The Complete Works of Zhuangzi. Translated by Burton Watson. New York: Columbia Univ. Press. Chapter 17: “The Autumn Floods.” (PDF)
  • Selection of stories from the Zuozhuan (Commentary of Mr. Zuo). In Owen, Stephen. An Anthology of Chinese Literature: Beginnings to 1911. New York: W.W. Norton, 1997. (PDF)
  • Shaughnessy, Edward L. Sources of Western Zhou History: Inscribed Bronze Vessels. Berkerley: University of California Press, 1992. (PDF)
  • Keightley, David. “Chapter 1: The Oracle Bone Inscriptions of the Late Shang Dynasty”. In Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1: From Earliest Times to 1600, edited by W. deBary et al. New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1999. (PDF)